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Mangareva

(Gambier Islands)

 

Introduction to Mangareva

Polynesian mythology tells of Mangareva being lifted from the ocean floor by the demi-god Maui. The mountains of Mangareva rise over the surrounding islands and the luminous lagoon like a great cathedral.

The Gambier archipelago is well off the beaten track. Travelers visiting this area will feel a sense of privilege as they’re welcomed and warmly greeted by the locals. These islands are secluded and offer both natural and cultural treasures, which create a perfect mix of well-being and a unique change of scenery.

Where is Mangareva?

The remote Gambier Islands lie more than 1,000 miles southeast of Tahiti. The flight is 4.25 hrs from Tahiti.

Map of Mangareva

Hotels in Mangareva

On Mangareva, you'll find guesthouses with friendly hosts. Remember, this is where you'll experience an authentic Polynesian way of life!

Pension Maroi

What to do in Mangareva

Many locals consider the lagoon of Mangareva to be the most beautiful in all of Tahiti. Turquoise and transparent with a sandy bottom, Mangareva's lagoon is dotted with coral heads, and shows a stunning range of blues. Contrasted with the surrounding lush green mountains, you'll quickly fall in love with Mangareva! Here hikers will find endless treasures to explore.

Although once the center of Catholicism in Polynesia, the people of Mangareva have returned to a more traditional Polynesian lifestyle. The island has become an important supply source for the Tahitian cultured pearl industry. Along with the pearl farms and tours of the island by road or car, travelers can also explore the surprising number of surviving churches, convents, watchtowers and schools from the 1800s. Some structures are still in use such as St. Michel of Rikitea Church where the altar is inlaid with iridescent mother-of-pearl shell.